Local Pubs Currently Under Threat

The Gladstone Arms (Borough), the Lord Hood (Greenwich), the Pizza Lounge (formerly Three Compasses, Rotherhithe), and the Boatman (Bermondsey) are all under threat of demolition. Join the fight to save them.

 

 

Gladstone Arms, 64 Lant Street, SE1 1QN

Punch sold the pub to a developer last year who has now made an application to demolish it and replace with a 10 storey block of flats.

View and comment on the application here.

This iconic community and live music venue is definitely worth preserving. View the WhatPub entry here.

Possible grounds for objection you may wish to include (not exhaustive by any means, ideally don’t copy and paste word for word) are:

(1) The application would result in significant over-development of a site with a small footprint situated down a small side street;

(2) The height of the proposed replacement 10 storey building is completely out of character with the locality as the vast majority of neighbouring properties are only 5 or 6 storeys. The proposals are therefore at odds with Policy 7.4 (Local Character) of the London Plan;

(3) The size of the proposed residential development has clearly been deliberately kept just below the level at which an affordable housing element would be needed. Therefore the development would make no contribution towards those in society least able to afford their own home;

(4) The application does not accord with Policy 7.1 (Building London’s Neighbourhoods & Communities) of the London Plan which states that development should improve people’s access to social and community infrastructure. In this case the development would result in the loss of a highly valued community pub asset;

(5) If the application is approved, the redevelopment of this site would result in the unacceptable loss of a historic Victorian building that adds significant character to the local street scene. We are also aware that the Walworth Society have submitted a listing application to Historic England;

(6) The application would result in the unacceptable loss of a very popular and valued local pub very much at the heart of the local community, and also providing an outstanding commitment to high quality, free, original live music that is unique in the area and draws people from all over London.

(7) The applicant has made no attempt to demonstrate the existing public house is not viable;

(8) The pub is now listed as an Asset of Community Value;

(9) The proposed replacement bar included within the application is only a little over a third of the size of the current pub, which itself is not a particularly large venue. Therefore the new bar would in no way be an adequate replacement for the current pub and it is questionable whether such a small venue would be viable – it would certainly not be able to maintain the same strong commitment to live music offered by the existing premises;

(10) Both section 70 of the National Planning Policy Framework and section 4.48A of the London Plan recognise the importance of public houses to local communities and seek to prevent their unnecessary loss – the proposed loss of the Gladstone Arms is completely unnecessary. The application also does not comply with Southwark Council’s emerging pub protection policy under Policy DM27 of the draft New Southwark Plan.

 

 

Lord Hood, 300 Creek Road, SE10 9SW

Application has been made to demolish the current building and replace with a 4/5 storey building comprising 8 flats and a ground floor bar.

The current pub dates from 1930s and in the opinion of the Greenwich Conservation Group is a good example of an inter-war public house. The pub also offers a different, generally quieter, environment than the other nearby pubs in Greenwich town centre and is very community focused.  It in particular attracts the local older generation and offers regular live jazz music, and a free pensioners Christmas meal and annual outing to the coast.

View and comment on the application here.

Possible grounds for objection you may wish to include (not exhaustive by any means, ideally don’t copy and paste word for word) are:

(1) The present building should be preserved as fine example of an inter-war public house located just outside the West Greenwich Conservation Area and the World Heritage Site;

(2) There is already significant development taking place along this section of Creek Road which has few buildings of character and historical note remaining – those that are should be protected;

(3) The current pub offers and different, generally quieter, drinking environment to the town centre pubs, and in particular attracts the older generation who would struggle to find an alternative nearby such venue;

(4) There is no certainty the proposed replacement bar will ever open;

(5) Section 70 of the NPPF, Section 4.48A of the London Plan, and Policy EA(b) of the Royal Greenwich Core Strategy all recognise the value of pubs to local communities and seek to prevent their unnecessary loss – this appln seeks to destroy a valued community asset.

 

Pizza Lounge (formerly Three Compasses), 346 Rotherhithe St, SE16 5EF

Currently closed, this pizza themed pub  formerly sold real ale and so could again.

The current building dates from the early 20th Century and is situated close to the Grade II listed Globe Wharf.

Application has been made for demolition and replacement with 4 storey building comprising 9 flats and a ground floor shop (Class A1 use).  There has therefore been no attempt made to retain pub use on the site.

View and comment on the application here.

Possible grounds for objection you may wish to include (not exhaustive by any means, ideally don’t copy and paste word for word) are:

(1) No doubt to get around pub protection policies, the application claims the premises are a restaurant whereas in fact it was technically a pub – it met the CAMRA definition of a pub as draught beer was available, drinks could be ordered without food, and service at a separate bar area was available;

(2) As a pub, the application is in contravention of s70 of the National Planning Policy Framework; the Mayor of London’s London Plan Policy 7.1 to improve people’s access to social and community infrastructure and paragraph 4.48A specifically around supporting pubs; and Policy DM27 of the draft New Southwark Plan. These policies require that the applicant demonstrates that the pub is no longer required which they have not done;

(3) The building is a good example of an inter-war public house, in good condition, well proportion and attractive in appearance, which makes a positive contribution to the street scene and local character.

(4) The building is of sufficient quality to be considered as a non-designated heritage asset and for draft policy DM27.3 to also apply. This would require the building to be retained even if the other criteria were met and the pub lost.

 

Boatman, 234 Jamaica Road, SE16 4BD

This former Courage neo Georgian style pub dates from around 1937 and retains many original features including wood panelling and signage.  It has been run for almost 30 years by the current owners who claim the business is no longer viable.

Application has been made to demolish the building and replace with a five story building comprising 6 flats plus ground floor/basement retail.

View and comment on the application here.

Possible grounds for objection you may wish to include (not exhaustive by any means, ideally don’t copy and paste word for word) are:

(1) The pub is a fine example of an inter-war public house that retains a number of original features and which should therefore be preserved. The architectural style of pubs from this period is gaining increasing recognition – Historic England recently completed a research project into such pubs which resulted in 21 of the best preserved examples being Grade II listed;

(2) the applicant has not sufficiently demonstrated the current public house is not and cannot be viable. Two of the examples of neighbouring pubs cited within the application are prime examples of how previously under-performing pubs can be turned around with an injection of new management/ownership, the St James of Bermondsey and the Gregorian;

(3) the proposals would result in the unacceptable and unjustified loss of a pub, and the applicant has not demonstrated that sufficient efforts have been made to market the property for sale or lease as a public house. This is not in compliance with the Council’s emerging Policy DM27 of the draft New Southwark Plan;

(4) Both section 70 of the National Planning Policy Framework and section 4.48A of the London Plan recognise the importance of public houses to local communities and seek to prevent their unnecessary loss. This application contravenes these planning policies.

 

For more help and guidance see our planning pages.